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The Role of Caspase-dependent Apoptosis in Ribloflavin Transporter Deficiency iPSCs and Their Derived Motor Neurons: Insights from Cell Death Discovery

The Role of Caspase-dependent Apoptosis in Riboflavin Transporter Deficiency iPSCs and Their Derived Motor Neurons: Insights from Cell Death Discovery

Riboflavin transporter deficiency (RTD) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by impaired transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) across cell membranes. This deficiency leads to a range of symptoms, including neurological abnormalities such as motor neuron degeneration. Recent research has shed light on the role of caspase-dependent apoptosis in RTD-induced cell death, particularly in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and their derived motor neurons.

iPSCs are generated by reprogramming adult cells, such as skin cells, into a pluripotent state, meaning they have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body. This technology has revolutionized disease modeling and drug discovery, allowing researchers to study the mechanisms underlying various disorders, including RTD.

In a study published in the journal Cell Death Discovery, researchers investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying RTD-induced cell death in iPSCs and their derived motor neurons. They found that RTD iPSCs exhibited increased susceptibility to apoptosis compared to healthy control iPSCs. Apoptosis is a programmed cell death process that plays a crucial role in development, tissue homeostasis, and disease.

The researchers further explored the involvement of caspases, a family of protease enzymes that are key players in apoptosis. They discovered that caspase-3, a well-known executioner caspase, was significantly activated in RTD iPSCs undergoing apoptosis. This finding suggests that caspase-dependent apoptosis is involved in the cell death observed in RTD.

To validate their findings, the researchers used specific caspase inhibitors to block caspase activity in RTD iPSCs. They observed a significant reduction in apoptosis, indicating that caspase activation is indeed responsible for the cell death observed in RTD. This highlights the potential therapeutic value of targeting caspases to prevent or mitigate cell death in RTD and other related disorders.

Furthermore, the researchers differentiated RTD iPSCs into motor neurons, which are the cells primarily affected in RTD patients. They found that these motor neurons also exhibited increased susceptibility to apoptosis compared to healthy control motor neurons. Caspase-3 activation was again observed in RTD motor neurons undergoing apoptosis, further supporting the role of caspase-dependent apoptosis in RTD-induced cell death.

The study also investigated the potential mechanisms underlying caspase activation in RTD. The researchers hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, a common feature in many neurodegenerative disorders, might be involved. They found that RTD iPSCs and motor neurons displayed mitochondrial abnormalities, including reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to caspase activation and subsequent cell death in RTD.

In conclusion, this study provides valuable insights into the role of caspase-dependent apoptosis in RTD-induced cell death, particularly in iPSCs and their derived motor neurons. The findings highlight the potential therapeutic value of targeting caspases and mitochondrial dysfunction to prevent or mitigate cell death in RTD and related disorders. Further research is needed to fully understand the underlying mechanisms and develop effective treatments for this rare genetic disorder.