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Mini Human Heart On A Chip – Breakthrough In Safer Cancer Treatments!

Mini Human Heart On A Chip
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Molecular Biology Techniques Hands-on Training + Internship Program Online & At IISc Incubated Lab - Protein Design

Molecular Biology Techniques Hands-on Training + Internship Program Online & At IISc Incubated Lab - Protein Design

Mini Human Heart On A Chip: A Breakthrough in Safer Cancer Treatments

In recent years, significant progress has been made in cancer treatment, but concerns about the potential side effects of chemotherapy on the heart remain. To address this critical issue, researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have developed a revolutionary “heart-on-a-chip” model. This miniature, laboratory-grown heart has the potential to transform cancer treatment safety by providing a controlled environment to assess cardiac risks associated with cancer therapies. This article will explore the groundbreaking technology behind the heart-on-a-chip and its implications for safer cancer treatments.

The Heart-On-A-Chip Model:

The heart-on-a-chip model developed by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center represents a significant advancement over previous models. The key innovation lies in the use of mature heart cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). By utilizing these mature heart cells, the researchers have created a more accurate representation of human heart function. Additionally, the chip displays a beating rate of approximately 60 beats per minute, mimicking the natural rhythm of a human heart.

Promising Benefits for Cancer Treatment Safety:

The primary purpose of the heart-on-a-chip model is to assess the cardiac risks associated with cancer therapies. While these treatments effectively

target cancer cells, they can unintentionally harm the heart. The heart-on-a-chip model provides a breakthrough solution by offering a controlled and ethical environment to test these drugs. This ensures that patient well-being is prioritized, and potential side effects on the heart can be identified early in the drug development process.

Reducing Reliance on Animal Models:

The researchers behind this innovative model envision a future where animal models are no longer the primary method for preclinical drug cardiotoxicity testing. Animal models have limitations and may not accurately represent human cardiac reactions to cancer treatments. Through the implementation of the heart-on-a-chip platform, researchers hope to reduce reliance on animal models and establish a more precise and reliable testing method.

Long-term Functional Stability:

One of the key features of the heart-on-a-chip model is its long-term functional stability. The researchers have demonstrated that the microfluidic organ chip can maintain the functionality of the hiPSC-derived heart cells over an extended period. This stability allows for prolonged testing and the evaluation of multi-lineage cardiotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents.

Potential Applications in Cancer Treatment:

The heart-on-a-chip model has the potential to revolutionize cancer treatment safety by providing a predictive platform for evaluating the cardiotoxic effects of drugs on multiple cardiovascular cell types. By screening potentially cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents in a physiologically relevant model, it becomes possible to identify safer treatment options and prevent adverse effects on the heart. This breakthrough technology could significantly improve patient outcomes in cancer treatment.

The development of the heart-on-a-chip model by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center marks a significant advancement in cancer treatment safety. By using mature heart cells derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells, this miniature heart offers a more accurate representation of human heart function. Its long-term functional stability and ability to evaluate multi-lineage cardiotoxicity make it a promising platform for testing the safety of cancer drugs. The heart-on-a-chip model has the potential to reduce reliance on animal models and improve patient outcomes in cancer treatment.

Keywords: Mini Human Heart On A Chip, heart-on-a-chip, cancer treatment safety, cardiac risks, laboratory-grown heart, mature heart cells, human induced pluripotent stem cells, cardiotoxicity, safer treatment options, predictive platform, animal models, patient outcomes.